About

J. Mary Luti

A retired seminary professor

and United Church of Christ pastor.

She can’t help herself.

She just keeps talking.

And posting,

for whatever it’s worth.

 

18 thoughts on “About

  1. Carol Lashnits

    Hi Mary! So happy to have found your blog.
    You probably don’t remember me…..but you were very inspiring to me while at ANTS from 1987-1992. I have been becoming a mystic, much as it scared me way back then. Blessings! Carol Lashnits

    Reply
    1. sicutlocutusest Post author

      Carol! Of course I remember! Seems like eons ago, but those years were memorable in so many ways! Isn’t it wonderful the way our deepest fears sometimes turn out to hold the key to a grace-full life? Blessings back at you! Courage and grace, M.

      Reply
      1. Carol Lashnits

        It WAS eons ago. I was emailing Sharon Van der Laan yesterday….talking about memories of you and Dan Novotny. Yes, memorable times for sure!!

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  4. Patricia Steely

    I just read my Stillspeaking Devotion and I wanted to thank you for sharing your thoughts. I find this blog online and thought I would communicate with you here.
    Your thoughts on the Boston Marathon Bombing beautifully expressed what I was feeling. Although my heart is heavy with grief for the participants and their families, my heart breaks daily at the reports of innocent people being slaughtered in Afganistan and other places. 30 people were murdered at that wedding (three times more than the death toll in Boston!) yet there is a righteous perception that when it happens on our soil it is somehow a more grave injustice.
    Thank you for writing something I could relate to. I am sad and broken at the wounds we cause each other, but I remain hopeful due to the hearts and hands that reach out to heal.

    Reply
    1. sicutlocutusest Post author

      Thank you for your kind words, Patricia. I am getting some not unexpected pushback about the devotion–some people feel it was ill-timed and that I should have written something more prayerful and comforting, that it’s too soon to be speaking the way I did. I understand that sentiment of course, but my heart was broken for more than Boston (I am a Bostonian by birth and upbringing, and I g to Old South Church, the church that sits at the marathon finish line, by the way). I was hearing so much “us and them” language that I felt a need to address it. I guess I just believe that Christ’s commandment to love the enemy (the one who lives inside us as well as the ‘other’) doesn’t run on a schedule of appropriate times and inappropriate times. Not too pastoral, maybe, but…. anyway, I am glad you found something to relate to in the devotion, and thanks again for writing.

      Reply
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  6. Lucy Ijams

    By the grace of the FB page of the Rev. Joe Cleveland (of Syracuse, NY, recently of Belmont, MA,) I found your site. “Saints be praised!” You are ever wonderfully writing in the liturgical style I knew and loved at ANTS. I enthusiastically tell people about the Church History II class in which we read novels, lo some twenty years ago. I still resonate with your question in my middler review about genuine humility/low self-esteem. I will bookmark sicutlocutusest.com Grazie mille

    Reply
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  10. mevashir

    Mary: your post about Passover Seders really stimulated my thinking. I am disappointed that you deleted my comment but in the end I realize that I have profited while you and your readers have lost out.
    Interesting discussion at this blog: http://sicutlocutusest.com/2014/04/11/no-christian-seders-please/

    I posted this comment but the author deleted it:

    I have had lots of experience leading Passover Seders both at college as a member of Hillel and in Israel as an ultra Orthodox Jew. The Seder was a high point of the year for me. I would prepare for about a month and utilize one of the modern Haggadot that have excellent commentaries. I always would get frustrated trying to balance the teaching portion with the need for the participants to eat and to finish up before midnight, as Jewish law requires.

    For many Jews, Passover is virtually their only link to Jewishness. They have little understanding about the meaning of the symbols. They don’t know about Elijah as forerunner to Messiah, since most Jews no longer believe in a personal Messiah but rather in a kind of nebulous Messianic Era (if that much!).

    I think the book by Dr. Humphreys provides excellent insight into the Passover conducted by Jesus. The lectures by Scott Hahn and Brant Pitre also provide insight into the connection between the Final Supper and the Eucharist. (I am not Catholic but have appreciated many Catholic teachings.)
    http://www.amazon.com/review/RBWE3J830XF87/ref=cm_cr_pr_perm?ie=UTF8&ASIN=052173200X
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GzaiwqsDAm8

    The problem for followers of Jesus is that for us Passover is tinged with sorrow. Since our Paschal lamb has died, I don’t think we can fully share the joy Jewish participants have in recollecting their Exodus from Egypt. Our joy is not complete until Easter Sunday when our Lord has risen from the grave, confirming retroactively that all He said and taught was true and that He truly is the Lamb of God who comes to take away the sins of the world.

    Jewish people tend to overeat and get intoxicated on Passover, something that the Gospel discussion of the Final Supper clearly averts by the various unusual things Jesus introduces into the meal: foot washings, New Covenant on Bread and Wine, prediction of betrayal, and departing for Gethsemane where He experienced agony in the garden. None of these poignant things are reflected in the conventional Jewish Passover.

    Whenever the Final Supper actually took place, the Jewish nation was eating its Passover Meal after Jesus had been brutally executed and was not lying in the tomb. Their joy contrasted sharply with the grief of Jesus’ followers and His mother. This grief is captured vividly in Mel Gibson’s film The Passion of the Christ when both Marys are reciting verses from the Haggadah while huddled in darkness and expecting the worst for Jesus at the hands of His enemies.

    So my reservation about Christian participation in Passover is that they cannot share in the unmitigated joy the Jewish participants are experiencing at this ceremonial meal and also most important of all this Jewish meal omits the New Covenant that Jesus taught without which we have no share in Him and no portion in the World to Come.

    Reply
    1. sicutlocutusest Post author

      I hope you will not assume that I deleted it as some sort of personal statement. If you read my final comment on the page, you will see that I have decided to bar all further comments; I’m not singling anyone out. I simply cannot keep up any longer with the volume of comments coming in, more than several of which have been demeaning to others, not informative and respectful. I do not like to suppress discussion, but it was my judgment that it would serve no purpose to keep the thread open, so I am deleting all further replies, even though we may miss some stimulating ideas as a result.

      Reply
      1. mevashir

        No matter. Your post stimulated my thinking and allowed me to share with my own readers my thoughts on this important topic. By the way, you do not necessarily have to respond to blog comments. You can allow your post to serve as a catalyst for others to discuss the issue. You do not need to try to control this process.

  11. sicutlocutusest Post author

    I understand that, but when some comments demean others, I feel that I have to exercise some ‘moderation.” I don’t want people insulted on my blog, period. Given the limited time I have for overseeing that, it was my decision to end the thread.

    Reply

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